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Water infrastructure funding boost for California

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The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced over $510 million (€480 million) from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda for California drinking water and clean water infrastructure upgrades.
This historic funding is part of over $50 billion (€47 million) in water infrastructure upgrade investments from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law – the largest investment in American history.
Almost half of this funding will be available as grants or principal forgiveness loans, ensuring funds reach disadvantaged and underserved communities most in need of investments in water infrastructure. This vital funding will support essential water infrastructure that protects public health and treasured water bodies across the state.
“President Biden’s Investing in America agenda continues to transform communities for the better with this latest infusion of funds for critical water infrastructure projects,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “With $50 billion in total, the largest investment in water infrastructure in our nation’s history, EPA will enable communities across the nation to ensure safer drinking water for their residents and rebuild vital clean water infrastructure to protect public health for decades to come.”
"All people deserve the peace of mind that the water they drink, swim and bathe in, and use to feed their families is safe, readily available, and clean," said EPA Pacific Southwest regional administrator Martha Guzman. "Thanks to President Biden's Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA is making this a reality for tens of millions of Americans throughout the Pacific Southwest, especially those that need it the most.
“In partnership with communities and state leaders, we're investing in cutting-edge technology, infrastructure, and nature-based solutions to provide sustainable, clean water that will improve the health and quality of life for communities and the environment."






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