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Pipelines still safest for liquid energy transport

By Tony Webster from Minneapolis, Minnesota - Bakken / Dakota Access Oil Pipeline, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54799766
By Tony Webster from Minneapolis, Minnesota - Bakken / Dakota Access Oil Pipeline, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54799766

Pipelines are still one of the safest ways to transport liquid energy, according to a new report.

The American Petroleum Institute (API), along with the Association of Oil Pipelines (AOPL), have published the Pipeline Safety Excellence performance Report and Strategic Plan 2017-2019, which summarises the pipeline industry’s record on safety and outlines the steps being taken by operators to further safety procedures throughout the pipeline supply chain.

“Pipelines are one of the safest and most efficient ways to transport liquid energy,” said API Pipeline Manager David Murk in a press release. “While nearly 100 percent of crude and petroleum products reach their destination safely, the industry remains committed to zero incidents. Strategic planning and the establishment of long-term goals will be critical for continuous, industry-wide pipeline safety improvements.”

2016 saw a 10% drop in pipeline incidents when compared to 2015, according to the new report. Although acknowledging there are some areas still in need of improvement, the report highlights the public benefits of pipelines and details the systems put in place by pipeline operators to protect people and the environment.

“This plan will help drive advances in pipeline safety technology, strengthen emergency preparedness and response planning, and encourage the adoption of holistic pipeline safety management systems,” said Murk.

API is a national trade association with 625 members from the US oil and gas industry. AOPL is a non-profit organisation representing the interests of owners and operators of America’s liquid pipelines.

By Tony Webster from Minneapolis, Minnesota - Bakken / Dakota Access Oil Pipeline, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54799766