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North Sea Link to boost hydro power to 1.4 million UK homes

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The world's longest undersea power connection has been switched on allowing Norway and the UK to share renewable energy.
The North Sea Link should see the UK reduce its carbon emissions by 23 million tonnes by 2030.
According to the National Grid, at full 1,400 megawatt capacity it will import enough hydro power to supply 1.4 million homes.
The 720-kilometre cable connects Blyth in Northumberland, in north-eastern England, to Kvilldall, a small village in south-western Norway.
It will initially have a maximum capacity of 700 megawatts (MW) which will be gradually increased to reach 1,400 MW in about three months' time.
The UK's National Grid, which operates the interconnector in a joint venture with Norway's Statnett system operator, said in a statement that once at full capacity, the North Sea Link will help power 1.4 million homes.
When wind generation in the UK will be high but energy demand low, extra renewable power will be exported from the UK to Norway and conserve water in Norway's reservoirs, according to the statement. However, when demand is high in the UK but wind generation is low, hydropower from Norway will be imported.
Cordi O'Hara, president of National Grid Ventures, said that it is "an exciting day for National Grid and an important step as we look to diversify and decarbonise the UK's electricity supply".
The interconnector took six years to complete at a cost of £1.6 billion (€1.9 billion).
The North Sea Link should see the UK reduce its carbon emissions by 23 million tonnes by 2030.
The interconnector took six years to complete at a cost of £1.6 billion (€1.9 billion).