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Smaller valve sizes OK for multiphase applications

By Tim Green from Bradford (Huddersfield University) [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Tim Green from Bradford (Huddersfield University) [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

A team of experts has discovered that using valves two sizes smaller ‘than normally specified’ will not reduce performance with multiphase applications.

The finding follows research by Matthew Charlton, head of Product Management at Weir Valves & Controls UK, and researchers from the University of Huddersfield. Charlton has explained the findings in an article on Weir’s website.

Key to the discovery was a computational fluid dynamics program. The first stage of the research saw a multiphase flow loop designed, which the university used to run multiple types of fluid through control and butterfly valves. The range of experimental results from this were then matched computationally.

A number of samples were experimentally and then the team developed a multiphase run-through computation model that matched the results. The results were then analysed and used to refine best known sizing methodology.

It was found, according to Charlton, that traditional industrial calculations were overestimating valve capacity and therefore the valve size. Apparently, the new sizing methodology improved accuracy by up to 60%,

The Weir Valves and University of Huddersfield project was performed as part of a Knowledge Transfer Partnership part funded by the UK Government backed Innovate UK.

Charlton’s article on the project can be found on the Weir website.

By Tim Green from Bradford (Huddersfield University) [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons